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Author Topic:   A. P. ADAMS
Ruth Monroe
(Moderator)
posted 5/30/01 3:50 PM     Click here to send email to Ruth Monroe  
During the late 1870s (circa 1876-79), CTR had a very short-term association with A. P. Adams. In the June 1, 1916 WatchTower "biography article", CTR says:
"It was after this, while a tour of the New England states that I met Mr. A. P. Adams, than a young Methodist minister, who became deeply interested and accepted the Message heartily during the week that I preached to his congregation. Subsequently I introduced him to little gatherings of interested ones in neighboring towns, and assisted otherwise, as I could, rejoicing in another who, with study, would soon be a colaborer in the Harvest field." ....
Later in this same article, CTR continues:
"It was this time that Mr. Adams espoused the views of Mr. Barbour, and likewise forsook the doctrine of the Ransom. And true to our interpretation of the parable of the Wedding Garment, as given at the time, Mr. Barbour and Mr. Adams, having cast off the Wedding Garment of Christ's Righteousness, went out of the light into the darkness of the world on the subjects once so clearly seen; namely, the time and manner of the Lord's presence; from that time, onward, they expected Christ, Spring or Fall, down to the Spring of 1892, which was their latest disappointment, so far as we heard."
In March 1885, A.P. Adams started a monthly magazine called "The Spirit of the Word", which Adams published out of Beverly, Mass. I do not know how long it continued.
Circa 1895, Adams published a book entitled, "The True Basis of Redemption". In the March 1, 1895 Watch Tower, CTR published a lengthy article challenging many of Adams assertions.
(I will post such, only if requested.)
Adams went on to publish many articles and books until his death, circa 1925.
A. P. Adams still has a religious following today, as evidenced by several websites which include many of his post-CTR writings.
Luis Argandona posted 5/26/02 6:45 AM     Click here to send email to Luis Argandona  
Hello. Please give me more information about AP Adams, his post-CTR articles, and the followers you said. Luis
Ton de Geus posted 10/21/02 2:10 PM     Click here to send email to Ton de Geus  
Dear sister At the website http://home.att.net/~fan4dolls/lost5.html
is a photograph of A.P. Adams, made in 1893 by J.C. Sunderlin.
I enjoy reading the postings
Ton de Geus
Ton de Geus posted 10/21/02 2:19 PM     Click here to send email to Ton de Geus  
In the Methodist New England Archives is a reference to a trial against Arthur P. Adams in 1878! See
http://www.bu.edu/sth/archives/cah/cahcne.htm
Ton
Gary Amirault posted 12/9/02 3:07 AM     Click here to send email to Gary Amirault  
I'd like that info on A.P. Adams if you have it. Also interested in where his other works are located. Please email to:
tentmaker@ktis.net
Thanks


http://www.tentmaker.org
Declaring the Savior of the world
Bruce posted 3/26/03 6:51 PM    
He was charged with preaching from the book Three Worlds and Plan of Redemption, which he acknowledged as contrary to Methodist Episcopal Doctrine. He was found guilty of heresy and suspended for one year, pending annual conference review. The church in Beverly MA supported him and refused to recognize the suspension or to allow the replacment pastor in the church, resulting in more charges of insubordination. At the New England Annual Conference on April 6, 1878, the conference affirmed a one-year suspension. The insubordination charges were brought against him on April 7, and a new trial was held, with a report back on April 8 that Adams was to be "expelled from the Methodist Episcopal Church" and his ordination documents were requested to be returned.
Bruce posted 3/16/07 10:27 PM    
The following represents the state of my research on Adams. The material is copyright. Please do not reproduce without permission.Arthur P. Adams (1847-?) was a Methodist clergyman and pastor of a church at Beverly, Massachusetts. He When Russell toured the New England states in mid to late 1877, Adams and probably with his wife Ophelia ("Addie" in the Census of 1880) attended Russell's lecture and was convinced by the message. In Harvest Siftings (1894) Russell recalled their meeting and Adams' conversion, describing Adams as "a young Methodist minister, who became deeply interested and accepted the message heartily during the week that I preached to his congregation. Subsequently, I introduced him to little gatherings of interested ones in neighboring towns, and assisted otherwise, as I could, rejoicing in another one who, with study, would soon be a co-laborer in the harvest field."Adams read Nelson Barbour's Three Worlds and preached that message to his church. He was charged with preaching from the book Three Worlds and Plan of Redemption, which he acknowledged as contrary to Methodist Episcopal Doctrine. He was found guilty of heresy and suspended for one year, pending annual conference review. The church in Beverly MA supported him and refused to recognize the suspension or to allow the replacment pastor in the church, resulting in more charges of insubordination. At the New England Annual Conference on April 6, 1878, the conference affirmed a one-year suspension. The insubordination charges were brought against him on April 7, and a new trial was held, with a report back on April 8 that Adams was to be "expelled from the Methodist Episcopal Church" and his ordination documents were requested to be returned. His expulsion was noted in the Lutheran Observer of March 1, 1878 and in Zion's Herald.When the movement fragmented over the Ransom and Atonement doctrine, Adams initial reaction was silence. He finally decided to espouse Barbour's views, and remained with the Herald of the Morning, eventually becoming Assistant Editor. The deciding factor was Barbour's more liberal views on who and how many would be saved. Barbour's view was as near Universal Salvation as one can get and not be a Universalist. Peters described Barbour's views as Rellyism, a type of Universal Salvationism. This appealed to Adams.Adams and Barbour parted ways in the mid-1880s. Adams wrote pamphlets or tracts sometime before 1885. I do not know the titles. The only reference to them is in the introduction to a reprint of Adams' magazine, and the titles are not given. One small undated booklet was titled "The True Basis for Redemption." Adams started The Spirit of the Word magazine in 1885 and continued it until at least February 1886. Because his views were similar to those of John Paton, they resumed an association that may never have completely ended. One wonders which persuaded the other. It is worth noting that the Ransom and Atonement controversy among Resitutionists (Barbourites, etc.) replayed a three centuries long controversy raging in Christendom that divided believers into three groups: 1. Eternal torment of the wicked; 2. Universal salvation for all; 3. Salvation for all but those who will not repent and eternal death without consciousness for the wicked.Adams became a significant force among those opposing Zion's Watch Tower. He became the source of trouble twice, once with the publication of The Spirit of the Word and again with the publication of his book Bible Harmony. Paton advertised Bible Harmony in World's Hope. Bible Harmony was read by many Watch Tower readers, and persuaded some. One letter to Russell said: "I learned that Mr. Adams had first gotten the truth from you (and I could see traces of the plan of the ages throughout his writings), and that he had as he supposed improved upon your writings: but to me his improvements had spoiled everything they mixed with."Adams, his magazine and book, or his beliefs are mentioned in the following issues of Zion's Watchtower: 1. March 1, 1895, Christian Common Sense. 2. January 1890, the New Covenant reprints page 1174 ff. 3. May 15, 1892, The Glory that Excelleth. 4. October 1, 1892 Zeal According to knowledge, p. 293. 5. April 1, 1891 A Criticism, page 56. 6. August 1890 Extracts from interesting Letters. (Other references exist, but these are easy to follow.)There are two photographs of A. P. Adams and one of his wife, all taken by John C. Sunderlin. Adams appears to have been living in 1903. He published a songbook that year.
Bruce posted 3/23/07 3:49 PM    
H. O. Severance: A Guide to the Current Periodicals and Serieals of the United States and Canada, Ann Arbor, 1907, lists Adams' Spirit of the Word magazine. I don't know the location of any copies except the reprint volume of the first year's issues.
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